Ukraine Civil War, Vladimir Putin, Western Intervention

The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention—But Does It Apply to Donbass?

Introduction by Kennedy Applebaum
Quemado Institute
March 18, 2016

Rajan Menon (--network2020.org)

Rajan Menon (–network2020.org)

I present below a review by Graham E. Fuller, posted yesterday at the Ron Paul Institute, of Rajan Menon’s new book The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention. Fuller, a former CIA official, portrays City University of New York Professor Menon as an enlightened critic of US neoconservative aggression abroad, a policy that has caused the deaths of tens or hundreds of thousands of innocent civilians, primarily in the Middle East. But as I was reading Fuller’s excellent synopsis, I had an uneasy sense this was too good to be true.

What then, I wondered, is Rajan’s opinion on Ukraine and Donbass?

Alas, my discovery was not a happy one. Rajan is apparently unaware that the US was largely responsible for the violent coup in Kiev that overthrew democratically elected President Viktor Yanukovich. He seems to maintain the propagandist fiction that Russia was not justified, after the coup, in annexing Crimea. The fact is, following a violent coup, leadership is up for grabs, and for want of established international law on post-coup transitions of power, any faction supported by the people has a right to step into the vacuum. The population of Crimea voted to go with Russia. This was as legal as anything else—and certainly more legal than the America-sponsored coup was in the first place.

Oleksandr Turchynov (--ibtimes.com)

Oleksandr Turchynov (–ibtimes.com)

Menon also seems to believe Russia instigated the Donbass revolt, not recognizing the ironic fact that Russia didn’t need to. Kiev regime leader President Petro Poroshenko managed to instigate it well enough himself by continuing to bomb civilians in Slavyansk,, a massacre begun by his temporary predecessor Oleksandr Turchynov.

Why is Menon enlightened about America’s “naked imperial ambitions” in the Middle East, yet clueless about the crimes of Poroshenko’s Western-backed post-coup government in Kiev?

Apparently anti-Putin propaganda has been so thorough, even careful scholars have missed the point.

I post first the book review, followed by excerpts revealing Menon’s opinion on Ukraine.

The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention
  Book Review by Graham E. Fuller

Ron Paul Institute
March 17, 2016

slavmar18sRajan Menon’s new book, “The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention,” (Oxford) launches a timely argument against a dominant argument lying behind so much of modern American foreign policy—“humanitarian intervention” or “liberal interventionism.” We are, of course, well familiar with Republican and neocon readiness to go to war, but the reality is that many Democrat Party leaders have been no less seduced into a series of optional foreign military interventions, with increasingly disastrous consequences. Hillary Clinton is today one of the leading exponents of the idea, but so are many of the advisors around President Obama.

Menon offers powerful argumentation skewering the concept of “humanitarian intervention,” demonstrating how it operates often as little more than a subtler form of an imperial agenda. Naked imperial ambitions tend to be recognizable for what they are. But when those global ambitions are cloaked in the liberal language of our “right to protect” oppressed peoples, prevent humanitarian outrages, stop genocide, and to topple noxious dictators, then the true motives behind such operations become harder to recognize. What humanitarian could object to such lofty goals? Yet the seductive character of these “liberal interventionist” policies end up serving—indeed camouflaging—a broad range of military objectives that rarely help and often harm the ostensible objects of our intervention.

Professor Rajan Menon brings a considerable variety of skills to bear in this brief and lucid book. Despite his first class academic credentials in the field, he also writes in clear and persuasive language for the concerned general reader. Second, Menon is no theoretician: he has worked closely with policy circles for many years and understands the players and operations as well as anyone outside government.

In rejecting the premise of “liberal interventionism” Menon is not exercising some hard-minded, bloodless vision of policy—quite the opposite. He is deeply concerned for the wellbeing of peoples and societies abroad—who are often among the primary victims of such liberal interventionism. He argues not as an isolationist but rather as an observer who has watched so many seemingly well-minded interventions turn into horror stories for the citizens involved. From a humanitarian point of view, can the deaths of half a million Iraqis and the dislocation of a million or so more be considered to have contributed to the wellbeing of “liberated Iraq?” As former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright once said, she regretted the death of 500,000 Iraqi children who, in Saddam’s Iraq, had been deprived of medicines under a long US embargo, but, she concluded, “it was worth it.” One wonders to whom it was worth it? Where is the humanitarian vision behind such a comment? Libya too has been transformed from an unpleasant but quiescent dictatorship under Qadhafi into a nightmare of raging militias, civil war, anarchy and a breeding ground of ISIS and al-Qa’ida. Afghanistan is still mired in conflict. So Menon is arguing not for a hardening of hearts, but for questioning the real-world outcomes of such seemingly “well-intentioned” wars.

Ultimately the case for “humanitarian intervention” is justified by the quest for international justice, protection of civilians, and the broadening of democratization and human rights. The US has regularly invoked these principles in justifying its ongoing— indeed nonstop— wars over the past several decades. Yet the sad reality is that the selective nature of US interventions raises serious questions about the true motivation behind invoking such “universal” values. US calls for “democratization” more often operate as punishment to its enemies (“regime change”) but rarely as a gift to be bestowed upon friends (“friendly dictators.”)

Menon argues, buttressing his case with striking examples from around the world, that such selective implementation of “universal values” by a global (imperial) power ends up tarnishing and diminishing the very values they are meant to promote; as a result they create broad cynicism around the world among those who perceive them as mere instruments of aggressive US global power projection. Yet when many genuine humanitarian crises do burst forth, as in Rwanda or in the ongoing agonies of the Congo (five million dead and counting) Washington has opted not to intervene because it did not perceive its immediate national interests to be threatened.

In short, the selective and opportunistic character of liberal interventionism ends up giving a bad name to liberalism. And it cruelly deceives many in the West who seek a more “liberal” foreign policy and yet who find that, in the end, they have only supported the projection of greater American geopolitical power—and usually at considerable human cost to the Iraqs, Afghanistans, Somalias, Libyas, and Columbias of the world.

Any reader of the book is eventually forced to confront a deeper question: when is war in fact “worth it”? Few would respond “never,” but many might respond “rarely.” Yet Menon is not arguing against war as such, so much as forcing us to acknowledge the faulty “liberal” foundation of our relentless quest for enemies to destroy—in the name of making the world a better place.

The title of the book, “The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention,” suggests that at the very least such policies are self-deceiving, in other cases perhaps deliberately meant to obfuscate. Menon here poses the question whether, for whatever motivation, great powers can ever sufficiently master the complexity of foreign societies to truly engineer a better life in the countries we target for remodeling. And whether we can afford an enterprise that might take decades at the least.

In the end we become aware of the unhealthy nature of combining broad ideals married to global power. In the case of the British Empire, and now the American, this combination readily leads to the manipulation and then corruption of those ideals—discrediting US prestige and credibility and damaging the lives of those living in troubled areas.

None of this is to say that there is never room for international intervention in arenas of horrific depredations against civilian populations. But it is only when such intervention is truly international (essentially UN-sanctioned and not a mere maneuver to insert NATO into another global hotspot) that it can it take on a measure of credibility and international respect. Otherwise it ends up perceived as a US proxy move against Russia, China, Iran, or some other adversary.

Menon’s book constitutes essential reading for anyone troubled by the ugly character of so much of the international scene these days, and yet dismayed by its exploitation by policy-makers who cloak invasion, power projections and military operations in the garb of humanitarian effort. Here is a cogent critique of the recent decades of US foreign policy misadventures in which our military has become the primary instrument of US policy—and justified in the name of humanitarian goals. We rarely get to hear these arguments so clearly presented.

Graham E. Fuller (--newsroom.ysu.edu)

Graham E. Fuller (–newsroom.ysu.edu)

 

Graham E. Fuller is a former senior CIA official, author of numerous books on the Muslim World. His latest book is “Breaking Faith: A novel of espionage and an American’s crisis of conscience in Pakistan.” (Amazon, Kindle) grahamefuller.com

 

 

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Conflict in Ukraine
The Unwinding of the Post–Cold War Order
By Rajan Menon and Eugene B. Rumer
Excerpts from Book Review

MIT Press

The current conflict in Ukraine has spawned the most serious crisis between Russia and the West since the end of the Cold War. It has undermined European security, raised questions about NATO’s future, and put an end to one of the most ambitious projects of U.S. foreign policy—building a partnership with Russia. It also threatens to undermine U.S. diplomatic efforts on issues ranging from terrorism to nuclear proliferation. And in the absence of direct negotiations, each side is betting that political and economic pressure will force the other to blink first. Caught in this dangerous game of chicken, the West cannot afford to lose sight of the importance of stable relations with Russia.

This book puts the conflict in historical perspective by examining the evolution of the crisis and assessing its implications both for the Crimean peninsula and for Russia’s relations with the West more generally. Experts in the international relations of post-Soviet states, political scientists Rajan Menon and Eugene Rumer clearly show what is at stake in Ukraine, explaining the key economic, political, and security challenges and prospects for overcoming them. They also discuss historical precedents, sketch likely outcomes, and propose policies for safeguarding U.S.-Russia relations in the future. In doing so, they provide a comprehensive and accessible study of a conflict whose consequences will be felt for many years to come.

“Here is a calm, clear alternative to the many emotional efforts to place blame for the crisis in Ukraine on one side alone…. Menon and Rumer leave no doubt about the boundaries Russia crossed in seizing Crimea and fueling the war in eastern Ukraine, but they do not settle for the common one-dimensional explanation that attributes Russian actions to President Vladimir Putin’s alleged imperial fantasies….. The modest length of the book and its crisp prose complement the efficiency and restraint of the analysis.” —Foreign Affairs [Emphasis by Kennedy Applebaum]

____________

Rajan Menon is Anne and Bernard Spitzer Professor of Political Science at the Powell School, City College of New York/City University of New York, Senior Research Scholar at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, Columbia University, and the author, most recently, of The End of Alliances. He is completing a book on humanitarian intervention and is a regular contributor to nationalinterest.org.

 

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